A recent study shows that almost half of all Texans have cut the cord from cable tv.

If you're one of the millions of people looking to save some money each month, you should consider dropping your cable subscription and look at streaming services.

About two years ago, my wife and I were talking about our cable bill and what channels we watch regularly. We both noticed the same thing: we are paying a lot of money for the handful of channels we actually watch. So we started to look at how we can watch our favorite shows but save money at the same time. That's when we decided to make the switch and cut-the-cord.

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The move was a little tough at first because we didn't know a lot about what streaming services were out there and which one offered the programming we wanted. After some quick research we went with Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon Prime.

We also moved from a cable package to just the streaming option and noticed we cut our "cable" bill in half. I can't believe we didn't think of this sooner.

Reviews.com just released a study that looked at Americans' TV viewing and found that 46% of those watching shows are doing so with streaming services of some kind. That's nearly half, and here in Texas that number is 48%.

At 48%, that put's Texas at 28th on the list of states that have cut-the-cord. Idaho was number one with 70%, and New Jersey was 50th on the list with only 28% moving to streaming options.

The same study found that Texans are spending an average of $49.50 per month on their streaming services. Of course, you'll need an internet provider to access your streaming sites, but if you buy your own equipment and not have to rent it from your provider, you could be saving quite a lot.

Cutting the cord was one of the best decisions we made, and if you're looking to save a couple of bucks each month, maybe it's time to review what you watch and see if it's worth it to keep the cable. You might find the results surprising.

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