Imagine if a state hundreds of miles away experienced a catastrophic storm, and your energy bill went up because of it.

That's the situation many gas customers in Minnesota now face after the spectacular failure of Texas' energy grid during February's deep freeze.

Honestly, I've had trouble keeping up with just how messy and complicated the energy crisis we faced her was, and apparently our problems radiated out to other states.

I just came across an article from Ars Technica reporting that gas utility customers in Minnesota are likely going to have to pay hundreds of dollars more this year after the state's utility commission requested a surcharge on customers' bills to make up for the $800 million more they had to spend on natural gas during Texas' crisis.

Apparently, Minnesota's largest gas utility, CenterPoint Energy, is based in Houston and supplies a big chunk of Southeastern Texas. They spent $500 million extra on gas during the week Texans were frozen in place, and they're looking to get the good people of Minnesota to help foot the bill with surcharges that include 8.75% interest.

The company is eyeing similar measures in Oklahoma and Arkansas.

Meanwhile, Minnesota's other big natural gas utility, Xcel Energy, also needs to find a way to recover additional expenses incurred when Texas' ability to supply gas froze solid (quite literally). They say they won't be charging customers interest to do it, though.

Here in Texas, our "leaders" are still scrambling to come up with solutions to the problems that caused blackouts and energy shortages during the extreme winter weather. (And, I'm sure, find a way to cover their own @$$es while playing the blame game.) One plan being considered even involves letting Berkshire Hathaway build backup power plants that you and I would pay for with higher energy bills.

How's the saying go? No man is an island? Well, Texas most definitely isn't an island, and our energy grid blunder is costing our neighbors.

LOOK INSIDE: Marfa's Santa Fe Railroad 'House' Belongs in Temple

Marfa is home to some pretty weird stuff. You've got the famous Marfa Lights, the mini Prada store, the Wrong Store, and Building 98, and that's all great, but they've been holding on to something that, in our opinion, belongs here in Temple.

Let's take a look inside this retired Santa Fe caboose. It could use some TLC, but it's in surprisingly good shape. If you've got $254,000 lying around and want to buy this piece of Texas history, Lauren Meader Fowlkes with the Odessa Board of Realtors can help you out.

LOOK: Texas' Most Wish Listed Airbnb

PICS: Texas 'Salvation Cabin' a Perfect Airbnb for Nature Lovers

Salvation Cabin in Wimberley lies in the Texas Hill Country between Austin and San Antonio. It's a charming 1-bedroom just next to the Blanco River, so depending on when you go, you could do some tubing and kayaking (host Adena even provides the tubes and watercraft), and there's a lot of hiking, exploring, fishing, and nature watching to do.