Are you thinking about moving? Whether you already live in Texas, or you're moving here from another state, you want to know about the best place to live.

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It's also a good idea to know about areas you would NOT want to call home.

Crime is a real problem in parts of Texas. The US Census Bureau estimates that the state of Texas is growing at a rate of 1,000 people per day, and more people means more crime.

The Most Dangerous Places to Live in Texas

The most dangerous places in Texas are usually areas or neighborhoods located inside larger cities. These areas have residents that are dealing with low paying jobs, high unemployment, and a lack of quality housing, resulting in poor living conditions with high crime.

In 2021, onlyinyourstate.com listed these areas as the nine most dangerous places in Texas after dark:

  • Corpus Christi - #9
  • Victoria - #8
  • Texarkana - #7
  • Beaumont - #6
  • Houston - #5
  • Amarillo - #4
  • Lubbock - #3
  • Odessa - #2
  • Bexar County - #1

These particular rankings were based on the amount of crimes per resident, including sexual assaults, robberies, and homicides.

The Worst Places to Live in Texas

Dangerous, crime-ridden areas are typically the last on our list of dream places to live. You want to feel safe, especially when you're at home, but short of building a moat and living in a fortified castle, there will be risks involved no matter where you go.

According to moneyinc.com, the top 10 worst places to live in Texas include some cities that may surprise you.

The Top 10 Worst Places to Live in Texas

While it's always a good idea to know about areas with the lowest crime rates and best recreational opportunities when you are looking for a place to live, it’s also important to know which places to avoid. Even if you move to a neighborhood with a low crime rate, you could also be close to less safe communities.

Here are the top 10 worst places to live in Texas according to moneyinc.com.

Now That You've Decided On A Place To Live, Where Will You Work?

How many people do you know that work from home? Since the pandemic, the number of employers with remote jobs has risen steadily.

WalletHub used 12 factors to compare 50 states and the District of Columbia, including the percentage of people working from home, internet cost, cybersecurity, plus size and population concentration of homes in the state.

Let's take a look at the states that are the best for remote work, and where Texas sits on the list nationwide.

Read More: The Most Dangerous City in Texas for 2022? You May Be Surprised