Not too long ago we couldn't even vote, now women may be held to the same requirements as men when it comes to the draft.

According to a report from The Hill, The Senate Armed Services Committee has included women in its annual defense policy bill, which would require women to sign up for the draft.

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What is the draft?

USA.gov states that, "a draft is the mandatory enrollment of individuals into the armed forces. The United States military has been all-volunteer since 1973. But an act of Congress could still reinstate the draft in case of a national emergency."

Who Must Register for the draft?

Currently, almost all men ages 18-25 who are U.S. citizens or are immigrants living in the U.S. are required to register with Selective Service. Citizens must register within 30 days of turning 18. Immigrants must register within 30 days of arriving in the U.S.

Penalties for Not Registering

If you do not register for the draft, you will not be eligible for federal student aid, federal job training, or a federal job. You may be prosecuted and face a fine of up to $250,000 and/or jail time of up to five years. If you’re an immigrant to the U.S., you will not be eligible for citizenship.

Happening Now

The senate panel has voted to amend the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) to "require the registration of women for Selective Service." Currently the bill has not become law, but both the house and the senate have worked to make the draft a requirement for women in previous years.

The new bill could go either way, but it looks like we'll have to wait and see.

LOOK: Milestones in women's history from the year you were born

Women have left marks on everything from entertainment and music to space exploration, athletics, and technology. Each passing year and new milestone makes it clear both how recent this history-making is in relation to the rest of the country, as well as how far we still need to go. The resulting timeline shows that women are constantly making history worthy of best-selling biographies and classroom textbooks; someone just needs to write about them.

Scroll through to find out when women in the U.S. and around the world won rights, the names of women who shattered the glass ceiling, and which country's women banded together to end a civil war.

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